Checking and catching up and I've missed you!

Because that novel isn't going to delay itself
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Sommer Leigh
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Checking and catching up and I've missed you!

Post by Sommer Leigh » August 30th, 2013, 2:34 pm

So this morning when I was doing everything except being productive because that's what you do when you start a 4 day weekend, I started reading this post on io9 called "The 7 Deadly Sins of Worldbuilding" and I had the strangest impulse to post it on the Bransforums.

It's been a long time since I've checked in. I miss everyone always and am starting to transition myself back to some of my old writing habits like coming here and sharing things like the 7 Deadly Sins of Worldbuilding.

What I really want to know is, how is everyone doing and are you writing and are you happy?

But also, I want to share this article. :-)
http://io9.com/7-deadly-sins-of-worldbuilding-998817537
May the word counts be ever in your favor. http://www.sommerleigh.com
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Re: Checking and catching up and I've missed you!

Post by Mark.W.Carson » September 6th, 2013, 1:36 pm

A wonderful read, Sommer. I think I've addressed most of these, some with more nuance than others.

JohnDurvin
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Re: Checking and catching up and I've missed you!

Post by JohnDurvin » September 20th, 2013, 11:31 pm

I agree with a lot of the article, but I disagree with number three--I don't see any reason why your fictional equivalent of Belgians should be an accurate representation of Belgians. That's the whole reason why I world-build, personally; I don't want to have to work within the framework of existing cultures and people. I think a much more important point to make with that rule is that you should avoid what TV Tropes calls a "Planet of Hats"--creating, for example, a one-dimensional civilization that's obsessed with hats, or being angry all the time, or anything else. Star Trek (when it's done well, anyway) is a good example of how to do it right; civilizations have cultural values, but it's not totally one-dimensional (again, when it's done right). (Also, Star Trek is often awful at violating Rule 4; they try to say this is because Earth's "hat" is cultural variety and humans are the weird ones for varying so much between individuals, but I think that's just a convenient cover-up.)
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Re: Checking and catching up and I've missed you!

Post by Claudie » September 25th, 2013, 2:35 pm

JohnDurvin wrote:I agree with a lot of the article, but I disagree with number three--I don't see any reason why your fictional equivalent of Belgians should be an accurate representation of Belgians. That's the whole reason why I world-build, personally; I don't want to have to work within the framework of existing cultures and people.

I think #3 is good, but strangely explained. Their main point is that the culture you create shouldn't be one-dimensional because ethnic groups aren't in real-life. Which is a seriously important thing in my book. I do agree, however, that if you're taking inspiration from a RL cultural group, it doesn't mean they should be the same. In truth, your version should be influenced by the rest of the worldbuild and differ in a way that makes sense and justifies the divergences. But the point is that it should never become a caricature or a way to demean the culture you inspired yourself from. Too many fantasy authors don't take the time to delve into the ethnic groups they borrow from and end up creating insulting slapstick versions of them (they often fail at #4 in the process, too)

--
I love #1. I think it's so easy to forget but when you use it, when you think about it real hard and see how it influences your story, you're setting yourself up for some really cool conflict that's rooted deep in your worldbuilding. I find using the World to slow and antagonise your characters, especially with daily logistics and pragmatic concerns, to be quite satisfying. I have an entire plotline revolving on the whole "Who deals with bodily wastes?" and it's a personal favourite.

#7 can also lead to that and is what often makes me love worldbuilding so much. It's also quite hard because there are so many things to think about. It's like, candyland for worldbuilding! I try to bounce ideas revolving around this off my boyfriend because he has a very logical, pragmatic mind and helps me work through the economic consequences of new elements. Discussing it with anyone really helps in my opinion because they'll come up with crazy different ideas than your own.
"I do not think there is any thrill [...] like that felt by the inventor as he sees some creation of the brain unfolding to success... Such emotions make a man forget food, sleep, friends, love, everything." -- Nikola Tesla

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