Good grammar test: can you pass?

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longknife
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Good grammar test: can you pass?

Post by longknife » April 16th, 2013, 2:47 pm

Drop by Father Serra's Legacy http://msgdaleday.blogspot.com. Comments always eagerly awaited - but only if you find the item interesting enough to respond to.

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Quill
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Re: Good grammar test: can you pass?

Post by Quill » April 16th, 2013, 5:01 pm

"Which of these names is in fact the nominative feminine singular of the gerundive mood imported direct from Latin?"

I didn't find it a grammar test so much as a grammar terminology test, and I gave up on it.

longknife
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Re: Good grammar test: can you pass?

Post by longknife » April 17th, 2013, 4:32 pm

I looked up "gerund" and the explanation was probably the most confusing piece of garbage I've ever read!
Drop by Father Serra's Legacy http://msgdaleday.blogspot.com. Comments always eagerly awaited - but only if you find the item interesting enough to respond to.

bcomet
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Re: Good grammar test: can you pass?

Post by bcomet » April 23rd, 2013, 5:26 pm

Ughhhhhhhh. And then, there is always how do characters "sound" when speaking, that must be considered (as many people do not use fully correct speech).

As for the dialect of gerund, there seems to be a fierce political standoff between the anti-gerund at all costs and gerunds are my birthright/Gertrude Stein/this is happening N.O.W. and I am free to express the now as I please factions.

We will always have Paris.

"A drone of earnest gerunds filled the room and only sometimes seemed..."

rabika
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Re: Good grammar test: can you pass?

Post by rabika » July 1st, 2013, 3:39 am

They depicts the draft horses as a "draught horse"..As it's only a personal opinion of the writer..His counter views may vary meanwhile.

longknife
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Re: Good grammar test: can you pass?

Post by longknife » July 13th, 2013, 3:36 pm

rabika wrote:They depicts the draft horses as a "draught horse"..As it's only a personal opinion of the writer..His counter views may vary meanwhile.
I'm having a similar problem with my editors. My novels are set in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. I used plough and they immediately changed it to plow. I had to explain the era of the novel.

Draught is another obsolete word with a German history that has been Anglicized.
Drop by Father Serra's Legacy http://msgdaleday.blogspot.com. Comments always eagerly awaited - but only if you find the item interesting enough to respond to.

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