Stars and White Spaces

The writing process, writing advice, and updates on your work in progress
Post Reply
User avatar
dios4vida
Posts: 1119
Joined: February 22nd, 2010, 4:08 pm
Location: Tucson, Arizona, USA
Contact:

Stars and White Spaces

Post by dios4vida » February 7th, 2013, 2:44 pm

When do you use which?

So here's the situation: my WIP has two POV characters. I've been using the three stars (* * *) to signify a change in POV. But I also have time lapses, where I need to set aside the following section as something different from the previous, within the same POV. I've been leaving a white space between those paragraphs to signify this.

My critique partner asked if I should be using stars for everything - time lapse within the same POV or changes. And now, I'm not so sure. Which should I be doing?
Brenda :)

Inspiration isn't about the muse. Inspiration is working until something clicks. ~Brandon Sanderson

longknife
Posts: 185
Joined: September 16th, 2012, 2:03 pm
Contact:

Re: Stars and White Spaces

Post by longknife » February 7th, 2013, 2:57 pm

Having just been through editing from my publication's crew, it appears that ***** is the approved way.
Drop by Father Serra's Legacy http://msgdaleday.blogspot.com. Comments always eagerly awaited - but only if you find the item interesting enough to respond to.

User avatar
polymath
Posts: 1821
Joined: December 8th, 2009, 11:22 am
Location: Babel
Contact:

Re: Stars and White Spaces

Post by polymath » February 7th, 2013, 5:49 pm

Blank line breaks signal minor transitions. For Standard Manuscript format, signal the blank line is intentionally left blank using a hash mark, #, on the blank line. The hash mark is a typesetter's mark meaning insert space, usually flush left for a blank line, though sometimes center justified. Naive readers, though, will not understand what the everloving heck that nonce character is doing or means on that blank line.

A set of center justified asterisks signals a major transition, be the major transition a time or viewpoint or other major transition. The next tier up for major transitions is a chapter break. For SMF, an asterisk set is placeholder text ornaments substituted with Standard Publication Format glyphs consistent with a house's design stylisms. A book or layout designer may elect to replace them with other text art, i.e., —☾☪☽— , or — § — , or a dingbat decorative glyph string or vine (vignette). The asterisk set is machine searchable and replaceable in one global action using a publishing software. So consistency is critical.

Asterisks are used as nonce characters, meaning they mean nothing intrinsic and can be used to call attention for fact, spelling, and evaluation of mechanical style checking consideration and search and replace.
Spread the love of written word.

User avatar
abc
Posts: 168
Joined: December 7th, 2009, 10:15 pm
Contact:

Re: Stars and White Spaces

Post by abc » February 8th, 2013, 10:26 am

Polymath, for some reason when I read the title of your post (Stars and White Spaces) I heard the Moody Blues' Knights in White Satin song in my head. Hmmm. Just wanted to share that.

User avatar
polymath
Posts: 1821
Joined: December 8th, 2009, 11:22 am
Location: Babel
Contact:

Re: Stars and White Spaces

Post by polymath » February 9th, 2013, 12:26 am

abc wrote:Polymath, for some reason when I read the title of your post (Stars and White Spaces) I heard the Moody Blues' Knights in White Satin song in my head. Hmmm. Just wanted to share that.
Great song, great band, top of the arts.
Spread the love of written word.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest