When Should You Feel Comfortable Calling Yourself a WRITER?

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A.M.Kuska
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Re: When Should You Feel Comfortable Calling Yourself a WRITER?

Post by A.M.Kuska » April 26th, 2010, 6:22 pm

I have always called myself a writer, even before I had my short stories published. Now instead of dealing with people asking me what I have published, I have to deal with a condecending smile. "Short Stories. Of course. You have to start out easy."

Blah. >.<

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marilyn peake
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Re: When Should You Feel Comfortable Calling Yourself a WRITER?

Post by marilyn peake » April 28th, 2010, 4:32 pm

When asked about the writing part of my life, I usually just say, “I write.” In my own mind, I’m a writer; but I fill other roles as well. I don’t really think about this so much anymore. I tend to think in terms of each writing project I’m working on, how to make it better, how to schedule time to write, stuff like that.
Marilyn Peake

Novels: THE FISHERMAN’S SON TRILOGY and GODS IN THE MACHINE. Numerous short stories. Contributor to BOOK: THE SEQUEL. Editor of several additional books. Awards include Silver Award, 2007 ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year Awards.

daringnovelist
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Re: When Should You Feel Comfortable Calling Yourself a WRITER?

Post by daringnovelist » May 2nd, 2010, 8:36 pm

You know, time just makes you feel more comfortable about anything.

When I started writing I got into the Clarion Workshop in Science Fiction and Fantasy Writing WAY before I was ready. It was a fabulous and mind-blowing experience, but one problem was that I am not an sf or fantasy writer. I'm a mystery writer. So I spent years (decades really) treading water, being drawn off course by my network of writers and editors, not writing work that was right for me, and not having any guidance from people who had much in common with what I needed to write.

So it took me a long long time to get where I am, which is a writer with scattered short publications, and articles, blogs, editorial and script reading experience - but one with a strong vision now what what and where I want to be. I'm LONG past the "am I really a writer" phase. If people are are confused by what that means, I can only give them a wry smile and chuckle ominously. And they respect it. (It's kinda like being that teacher who can walk into a room of wild kids and get immediate obedience - something in the eyes tells them you mean business.)

So I think you are a writer when you feel like you're a writer, and when you act like a writer. (And I don't mean posture, I mean you write.)

Camille

addie
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Re: When Should You Feel Comfortable Calling Yourself a WRITER?

Post by addie » May 3rd, 2010, 1:22 pm

I read once that in order to become a writer, you must think of yourself as a writer. I haven't had anything published, but I say I'm an aspiring writer (yes, I use the qualifier as a crutch), so I feel obligated to get myself published. So far, I haven't gotten any sarcastic reactions.
~an aspiring writer and archaeologist

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Mark
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Re: When Should You Feel Comfortable Calling Yourself a WRITER?

Post by Mark » May 7th, 2010, 6:41 pm

These days 'writer' sounds so much more attractive than my alternative 'unemployed'.

I did, however, discover that when searching for a new apartment and trying to fill out the occupation field on a rental form, the two words come off remarkably similar in meaning.

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emvtc
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Re: When Should You Feel Comfortable Calling Yourself a WRITER?

Post by emvtc » May 16th, 2010, 3:58 pm

Writer doesn't necessarily mean someone who's unemployed, a writer is someone who writes (duh). Any idiot can be a writer. Technically.

An author is something entirely different. An author is someone who has sold a piece of writing and has been published. I call myself a writer (and I'm not even in college yet) but not an author. That is where I make the distinction.
I want to unfold. I don't want to be folded anywhere, because there, where I'm folded, I am a lie.
Rilke

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